How to Write a Great Yoga Teacher Bio in 20 Minutes

by Lucas Rockwood (DYT, Master Trainer)

As a yoga teacher, you’ll need to write a yoga teacher biography for your website or for the studio’s site where you work. You want to present yourself well, but you don’t want to brag. You want to share your experiences in a professional way, but you don’t want to sound boring or academic.

Scripting your bio should be a simple project, but it can quickly turn into days or even weeks. Even with draft after draft, sometimes it still doesn’t feel right.

If your bio is for your own website, you can write in first person or third person. You can include stories, logos, external links, and more. As great as that is, all these choices can become overwhelming. If in doubt, less is more.

If your bio is for a studio’s website where you work, you have fewer options. Each studio has its own style, so read through the other bios and write yours to match the tone of the other teachers’ profiles.

To make the process easier, I’ve written some basic guidelines to help you knock out a great 200-300 word bio in twenty minutes or fewer. Don’t get overwhelmed trying to write the entire thing in one go. Instead, break it down into sections and work on each part individually.

how-to-write-yoga-teacher-bio

SECTION I: The “Before & After” Intro

1st Person Sample: I discovered yoga while working at an advertising agency in New York City. Seven years into my job, I was burnt out, disillusioned by the corporate world, and looking for something more meaningful. There was a studio next to the office where I began taking classes. It started with two days a week, but within six months, I was a daily student. I started leaving work early to get to my favorite teacher’s classes, and very quickly, I realized my yoga was more important than my job.

3rd Person Sample: Lucas discovered yoga while working at a prominent New York City advertising agency. What had started as a dream job slowly left him feeling burnt out and disillusioned with the corporate world. He began taking classes at a local studio. At first, he’d join class twice a week, but within six months, he was practicing every single day and sneaking out of work early to catch sessions with his favorite instructor. That’s when he realized that yoga had become the most important thing in his life.

SECTION II: Student-to-Teacher Journey

1st Person Sample: My first teacher, John Doe, offered a 12-week Yoga Teacher Training. I joined initially out of personal interest, but by the end of the first month, I had already given notice at my job and made plans to make yoga my career, not just my hobby. I got my first teaching job upon graduating, and to date, I’ve taught in seven studios in the New York Metro area. I’ve trained with leading yoga, anatomy, and philosophy teachers including Larry Page, Carl Sagon, and Paige Linderman.

3rd Person Sample: Lucas enrolled in a 12-week Yoga Teacher Training with his first teacher, John Doe, with the intention to deepen his personal practice. After just the first month, he resigned from his corporate job and made plans to start a new career teaching. Lucas started teaching professionally immediately after graduation and he now teaches in seven different yoga and fitness centers in New York City. His professional teaching journey continues as he has trained with Larry Page, Carl Sagon, and Paige Linderman.

SECTION III: What to Expect / My Classes

1st Person: For me, yoga is about the balance between strength and flexibility, exertion, and releasing. So, my classes combine both strength and mobility work in a dynamic, Vinyasa Flow style. Expect to move, sweat, and breathe.

3rd Person: Lucas’ approach to yoga remains ever focused on the balance between strength and flexibility, exertion, and release. His classes focus on Vinyasa Flow, and you can expect to move, sweat, and breathe.

Put it All Together: Yoga Teacher Bio Examples

1st person bio • Approx 200 words

TEACHER NAME – I discovered yoga while working at an advertising agency in New York City. Seven years into my job, I was burnt out, disillusioned by the corporate world, and looking for something more meaningful. There was a studio next to the office where I began taking classes. It started with two days a week, but within six months, I was a daily student. I started leaving work early to get to my favorite teacher’s classes, and very quickly, I realized my yoga was more important than my job.

My first teacher, John Doe, offered a 12-week Yoga Teacher Training. I joined initially out of personal interest, but by the end of the first month, I had already given notice at my job and made plans to make yoga my career, not just my hobby. I got my first teaching job upon graduating, and to date, I’ve taught in seven studios in the New York Metro area. I’ve trained with leading yoga, anatomy, and philosophy teachers including Larry Page, Carl Sagon, and Paige Linderman.

For me, yoga is about the balance between strength and flexibility, exertion, and releasing. So, my classes combine both strength and mobility work in a dynamic, Vinyasa Flow style. Expect to move, sweat, and breathe.

3rd person • Approx 180 words

TEACHER NAME – Lucas discovered yoga while working at a prominent New York City advertising agency. What had started as a dream job slowly left him feeling burnt out and disillusioned with the corporate world. He began taking classes at a local studio. At first, he’d join class twice a week, but within six months, he was practicing every single day and sneaking out of work early to catch sessions with his favorite instructor. That’s when he realized that yoga had become the most important thing in his life.

He enrolled in a 12-week Yoga Teacher Training with his first teacher, John Doe, with the intention to deepen his personal practice. After just the first month, he resigned from his corporate job and made plans to start a new career teaching. Lucas started teaching professionally immediately after graduation and he now teaches in seven different yoga and fitness centers in New York City. His professional teaching journey continues as he has trained with Larry Page, Carl Sagon, and Paige Linderman.

Lucas’ approach to yoga remains ever focused on the balance between strength and flexibility, exertion, and release. His classes focus on Vinyasa Flow, and you can expect to move, sweat, and breathe.

Do’s and Don’ts of Crafting a Teacher Bio

Do share the teachers and styles that have influenced you.
Don’t say you’re a “registered” or “certified.” That’ll be assumed.

Do be clear, concise, and accurate.
Don’t brag, exaggerate, or try to impress.

Do use conversational, grammatically-correct language.
Don’t try to be cute, silly, or funny.

Do share your real-world experiences and knowledge.
Don’t try to fit some yogi stereotype that is not true to you.

Do share relevant, related interests such as other movement practices, bodywork, health, and nutrition.
Don’t include references to your dog, your favorite coffee, or other irrelevant things.

Do share your approach to yoga.
Don’t criticize other styles of yoga or approaches.

Do inject your bio with your personal energy.
Don’t quote Rumi, Gandhi or Mother Teresa (it’s cliche).